Issued: 24 May 2017

BABCP advice for people in the aftermath of traumatic events

BABCP is the lead body supporting Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approaches in the UK and Ireland.

We share a sense of shock and outrage at the horrific recent bombing at the Manchester Arena.

If you or a loved one has been caught up in whatever way, it might mean you are seeking help or support about how to deal with traumatic events like these.

It is absolutely normal to feel a range of feelings in response to serious traumatic events like the bombing; to feel upset, angry, confused, or fearful. These are normal reactions to abnormal circumstances and they don’t mean that you are losing control.

It can be helpful to talk to trusted friends and family about how you are feeling. We recommend against using drink or illegal drugs to cope as they can interfere with your ability to work through what has happened.

Most people, including children and teenagers, who experience traumatic events don’t develop post trauma reactions of the sort that need specialist support, but instead find relief from the support they receive from their friends, family and loved ones.

However, if you do find that strong emotions persist for a long time (over a month) or you are turning to drink or drugs to help you cope, you might want to go and see your GP who can help you seek support.

Talking therapies such as CBT can help with post-traumatic reactions and these therapies are available on the NHS, and also through third sector and independent practitioners. BABCP Accredited therapists can be found via the following link:

www.cbtregisteruk.com

If you want to read more about post-traumatic stress reactions or how to help children with these difficulties the Royal College of Psychiatrists has some useful information on coping after a traumatic event:

Coping after a traumatic event

and traumatic stress in young people:

Traumatic stress in children